Weirdo’ween

WEIRDO’WEEN #21: Halloween [1978]

weirdoween2015To conclude our “slasher trilogy” of sorts, let’s play with imagination for a minute: the year is 1963, and the night: Halloween. Police Officers are called to 43 Lampkin Lane only to discover that 15 year old Judith Myers has been stabbed to death – by her 6 year-old brother – Michael. After being placed in a psychiatric ward for 15 years, Myers breaks out on the night before Halloween. No one knows, or wants to find out, what will happen on October 31st, 1978 besides Myers‘ psychiatrist, Dr. Loomis. He knows Michael is planning to head back to his home town of Haddonfield, but by the time the town realizes it, it’ll be much too late for many of it’s people.

For today’s movie we look at a staple in horror cinema. One that feels so important, that many tried to imitate it’s stylistic atmosphere, music, and even it’s killer! It’s presence in the horror genre today still makes it something that has fear in people’s eyes when they hear the name Michael Myers. Today, ladies and gentlemen, we’re going to review that only makes sense to review on Halloween:

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The story line is perfectly simple, Michael stalks and kills babysitters. Nothing else, just the basic man kills people. But, it’s Carpenter‘s almost over-powering atmosphere of dread that generates the tension we feel as we’re watching. Like any other great horror film, events are telegraphed long in advance, yet they still seem to occur when we aren’t expecting it, therefore never allowing us as the audience the chance to second guess what the film is about to do. With it’s dark lighting, the long steady-cam shots, and [most importantly] that damn eerie music, gives it the ability to create one of the most claustrophobic and uncomfortable scenes in horror film history. There is a body count, but compared to the slashers that came after this it’s actually not that many people who get killed. One of the interesting thing is that Michael‘s murders are nearly bloodless: The fear is not the kill itself, but in knowing that it happened. That he does it without a second thought.


If you really think about it, John Carpenter made a low budget film and ended up scaring a generation of movie goers. He proved that you don’t need budgets in the 8 or 9 figures to produce fear in an audience. Because, as he shows us in Halloween, sometimes the best element of fear is not what actually is going on, but what is about to happen.. He makes the movie watchers worried, almost to ask themselves: what was that shadow? Or, What was that noise upstairs? He knows that these are some of the best ways to scare someone and he uses every element of textbook horror that you can use. Unlike movies that have come out in recent years, we’re numb to giant special effect monsters that makes loud noises and jumps out of a wall. It’s when we have moments when the killer is lurking, somewhere, and you don’t know where that is, that can truly scare you. Halloween succeeds like no other film because of this.

What makes Myers so effective is that we get the very briefest of introductions to who [or what] he is, just showing him as some kid who killed his sister, without ever saying why, just made it “work”. Even without any explanation, when he does escape, you know right then and there that someone is going to get hurt. The teens he stalks come off as normal and have the look of everyday people. People that you could know, in a town that you could live in. Only on this night, Halloween, Evil has come home. I mean, yes – It’s simple, but it’s the simplicity of is what makes it so scary. Would this have been as frightening if say, there was some giant monster with four arms running around killing people? Not as much. Because Michael is just a regular person in a mask, [although the “very face of evil”] this story feels like something that could actually happen.

The best way to look at it is Michael ceased to be a person once he first killed. He is not a serial killer, a human being or even a psychopath: He is an unstoppable force. The bleached-white Shatner mask, and lack of any dialog other then some breathing, helps to dehumanize and complete Michael‘s loss of humanity. This comes off as the source of all his power: He is faceless, speechless and unremarkable in any way other than as a source of unrelenting chaos. The over the top performance and uneasiness sells Michael as a character. This is helped by Carpenter‘s cinematography and the lack of information/motivation/explanation given to us by Doctor Loomis.  This is also the first film performance by Jamie Lee Curtis as Laurie Strode, the innocent girl who tries to stop chaos in the face of overwhelming odds [at least for a little bit]

Ultimately though, this is John Carpenter‘s movie: He Directed it, co-wrote it, co-produced it, and wrote the chilling score for it! This is a man of brilliance, and his later movie The Thing supports this. [I did a review on The Thing over here!] The famous opening scene is disturbing, but not very scary by today’s standards; and not many of the scares work for the first part of the movie. It’s not that it’s a bad movie, it’s just that there’s reason to fear “The Shape” anymore. Luckily, Carpenter mostly uses this time to set up a relationship between the characters and the audience. We grow to get to know the characters, but not so much that we feel like absolute garbage when they get killed. But once the film gets to Halloween night, that’s when Carpenter kicks things into high gear, proving that this is the movie He came home!

Halloween still holds up as one of the most important films in the horror genre; especially because it helped redefine the term “slasher”. As for Michael Myers, while he too got many sequels and a remake, [and a sequel to that remake] He still stands as an important character – because without him, we wouldn’t have gotten characters like Jason and Freddy. How do you like your slasher villain? Are you a fan of the silent, stalk-y types like Jason and Michael? Or do you prefer wise cracking killers, like Freddy? As I mentioned yesterday, I’ve always considered myself a Krueger fan boy, because they’re the ones I grew up with. Which do you prefer? Let me know in a comment or two!

Also, If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review[s], please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #22! – So STAY TUNED!

“have you checked the children?” [wait, that’s the wrong movie isn’t it?]

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #20: FRIDAY THE 13th [1980]

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While in retrospect, this review would have made sense for #13, today’s movie involves a boy who drowned and his angry Mother. It all starts one summer at Camp Crystal Lake, where a group of young counselors begin to get ready to lead campers. Unfortunately for these teenagers, someone isn’t happy about what’s going on in the camp and enjoys playing a game of “kill the counselor.” As bodies fall to the ground and the number of deaths keeps rising, it becomes quite apparent that no one is safe. Like yesterday‘s review, Everyone has heard of the movie I’m about to talk about; if not only by title.

Also, like yesterday’s review, today’s film had numerous sequels – some better than others – and a remake. So without further ado, let’s talk about a series that I enjoy, just not as much as Nightmare: Friday The 13th

weirdo'ween-#20The movie takes place in and around Camp Crystal Lake: the site of the drowning “death” of a young boy, several fires, and a double murder. For this reason, it earned the nickname “Camp Blood“, and has been closed for decades, only now being renovated in an attempt to reopen it and turn it back into an relaxing summer getaway. Ramblings of the town drunk, Crazy Ralph, tells the new group working there that they are all “doomed”, though they go on ignoring his drunken ways. But when a series of murders begin during a torrential rainstorm, who is responsible? Could it be Crazy Ralph from earlier, since he seemingly always is prowling the campgrounds? Or is it an unseen killer?

For a movie with such a low budget, [only $550,000] the film has a brilliant, and old fashioned sounding soundtrack, with it’s violins screeching at key moments in the action, just like Psycho did 20 years earlier. One of the most memorable and effective uses of soundtrack on film I can think of. The girls are cute without being overly pretty, and the guys are able to joke around without being complete assholes; unlike the movies of today.


Even when characters are outside at the actual lake, or out in the woods, Friday still has that claustrophobic feel, with the action taking place in tight, and often crowded feeling corners. The thick woods prevent them from getting very far away, and with the night time rainstorm only seals them in tighter, making escape almost impossible. If you were to go back and look at the 1980 critical response for the Friday The 13th, you’ll notice that the film was widely panned by critics, with many taking exception to the more over the top gore and camera angles of the film.

It’s fair to say that Friday The 13th may not be original in its own right, with Halloween having only been made two years earlier, and borrowing things from Psycho. But as a whole, it’s actually not a typical slasher movie, since it’s villain isn’t revealed until near the end of the movie, and then we ultimately find that the antagonist is far from a Michael Myers clone, but more of a psychopathic killer. This film is infinitely more cerebral than its typical “slasher” movie counterparts, even if it did get a ton of sequels; which happened to be a thing in the 1980’s. And as much as the camera angles might have been controversially irritating at the time, the first-person views from the angle of the killer and the conventions with it marked the start of a new movement in cinema, one that certainly has often been imitated even if it’s rarely done as effectively as it is in the opening scene.

also, Kevin Bacon shows up..and dies. sorry, ladies.

Then there’s the special effects. Friday The 13th was a landmark film for Tom Savini. As if he wasn’t already great, he further proved his ability to get the most effect out of the least financial situation. Savini will go down in history as one of the greats in special effects – and Friday The 13th helped him prove his mastery of the art.

One thing this movie handles well that I really appreciate is it’s pacing. It isn’t slow, but it also doesn’t move too fast; making it easy enough to follow. It takes roughly 20 minutes to get to an actual death scene, but this gives the movie enough time to flesh out some characters without taking too long to add unneeded exposition or add too much than what is actually needed. I feel like the movie did a good job of focusing on what was really needed, while fleshing out the kill scenes in an orderly fashion. That’s something that makes a horror movie “good.”

Overall, Friday The 13th‘s story telling is exceedingly well crafted and works greatly with it’s pace. While the story may be somewhat basic and straightforward, it’s the execution that really helps the final pay off. Not only is it well made, but it’s fun to watch, and like Nightmare, it’s important to the horror genre – without it, we wouldn’t have some of the great films that we are now familiar with in the horror category. There’s a reason it spawned ten sequels and a remake. People like these movies. As long as there’s a Friday The 13th on the calendar, the tale of Camp Blood will almost always continue.

So although I’m clearly a bigger fan of the Nightmare On Elm Street franchise, Friday The 13th is just as important as a film series. It has fear, it’s violent, and it’s got everything you could want from a horror film. Although this one went on for ten sequels – that did suffer from sequelitis – the films are more than just violent, hockey masked killers.. they are legitimately fun to watch; even if they are laughable by today’s standards. So check Friday The 13th out, and enjoy watching teenagers getting slaughtered by hockey masked villain!

If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review[s], please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #21! – So STAY TUNED!

this ending always makes me jump..screw you, Jason.

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #19: A Nightmare On Elm Street [1984]

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NOTE: As he passed away at the end of August 2015, this review is dedicated to you, Mr. [Wes] Craven. Thanks for all the Nightmares, and for creating what I consider my all time favorite horror franchise.


Something I used to hate when I was younger, that I really enjoy now is getting the chance to go to sleep. After a hard day’s work or even a day filled with nothing but movies and video games, nothing feels better then lying down and catching some down time.. That is, unless you’re being plagued by a sleep-demon who is trying to kill you in your dreams! Worse yet – if he succeeds; you die for real!

So here we go, ladies and gentlemen, assuming you haven’t caught on yet; [which if you haven’t, we need to have a discussion about your lack of horror knowledge] today’s movie is the first in a franchise that went on for seven films: [and that’s not including a mashup film and a [[terrible]] remake!] we’re talking about A Nightmare On Elm Street!

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Everyone, and I mean Everyone has at least heard of our villain: Freddy Krueger. The easiest way to describe him is that he’s a psychopath who murdered several children with a custom glove fitted with straight razor blades attached to each one of the fingers. Oh, and he attacks/kills you in your dreams, all while making really amusing puns [at least I appreciate the puns] as he cackles! Here’s a lengthier explanation of just what happens in A Nightmare On Elm Street:

It all started when a judge set him free of his charges, that Krueger is burned alive in the boiler room of a school [where he worked] by the [obviously] angry group of parents whose children he terrorized! However, the actual film takes place years after his death, when the children whose parents were responsible for Krueger‘s death – including Nancy Thompson, who is the daughter of the police officer who arrested Krueger all those years ago- start experiencing terrifying nightmares involving a dirty dressed, and burnt man wearing a glove with razor blades on it’s fingers. [sound familiar yet?] As it turns out, it’s actually the ghost of Freddy Krueger haunting their dreams; and when Nancy‘s best friend Tina dies in her sleep with 4 straight cuts across her chest, Nancy realizes that she [along with the other kids] must find a way to stop the evil psychopath’s dream terrors – or risk never sleeping again…

What makes A Nightmare On Elm Street so clever is how it creates an entirely new way of representing dreams sequences on screen. In the movie, the scenes that take place during a “dream” are filmed within an airy and murky atmosphere, but the catch is; so are many of the waking scenes. This makes it very difficult to tell whether a character is awake or asleep. [which is ideal considering the plot!] While the movie never actually shows any character actually fall asleep, as a result we are constantly questioning whenever characters so much as close their eyes – even for a moment. In some of the more crucial scenes, it is impossible to tell whether what we are seeing is real or happening only in a character’s mind. But the movie ultimately suggests that the difference doesn’t matter. That, one way or another, Freddy will get you.

The actual premise of the movie, which has a child-killer haunting a group of teenagers’ dreams and has the capability of killing them while they’re asleep, ends up turning the whole “It was all just a dream” convention over on its head: according to Nightmare, the real world is safe, and the dream world is extremely dangerous. I mean, think about it: Unlike any other movie – where you can run and hide in the closet – Freddy attacks when you’re most vulnerable; when you’re sleeping.. how can you not sleep?

Director Wes Craven – RIP understood that the anticipation of danger tends to be more frightening than the actual attack; and he shows us some great visual shots using that effect, including one where Freddy‘s arms becomes unnaturally long in an alleyway, and another where the stairs literally turn into a gooey glue-like substance, almost as a nod of the common nightmare where it is hard to get away from someone chasing you. The movie constantly finds ways to tease the audience, never resorting to a red herring, which let’s be honest: is becoming a very tired convention used in almost all other slasher films. Especially in recent horror.

A fun fact about Nightmare is that this was actually Johnny Depp‘s first role, playing the character of GlenHeather Langenkamp‘s [Nancy] boyfriend, and although he does get a few neat lines, his personality is not overly fleshed out, and because it’s the 80s, there is no sense of the great actor Depp would go on to become in today’s age.

also, Johnny Depp dies quite brutally in the film; sorry, ladies.

Ultimately though, A Nightmare on Elm Street is really all about Nancy. As fans know, the film mainly focuses on Nancy‘s troubles, mostly Nancy‘s dreams and Nancy‘s responding actions. The ending of the film becomes a bit confusing, but it’s meant to be – basically asking us to answer the question: did all this happen? Or is this yet another dream? The booby traps that Nancy sets when Freddy finally comes into the “real world” are unfortunately a bit ridiculous, and Freddy does seem kind of helpless [almost to the point of lame] chasing Nancy around her home as he’s trying catch her, and it’s something the film could have done a little better. But that’s just a tiny complaint. I can live with it! Overall, it is a great mixture of horror, thriller and fantasy. A Nightmare On Elm Street taps into two hardly recognized everyday events in human life: sleeping and dreaming, and makes them into something we can learn to fear. Craven‘s ability to realize this unknown fear in a movie is something that hadn’t been done before, and it worked perfectly. A Nightmare On Elm Street still stands as a great movie [even with it’s terrible remake – and another remake on the way] and for horror buffs it is a must-see and for those that aren’t into horror, there is still a fair amount of other things to keep one’s interest on the screen. [and I’m not just talking about Mr. Depp‘s extremely dreamy – see what I did there? – appearance]

So seriously go and watch A Nightmare On Elm Street. It’s my favorite franchise of all time, and even if the sequels did suffer from sequelitis and there was that garbage remake, they’re some of the most entertaining films you can ask for! Also, if you want me to review the second film in this franchise, let me know in a comment! If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review[s], please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #20! – So STAY TUNED!

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #18: C.H.U.D. [1984]

PLEASE NOTE: If you follow me on Facebook, I posted saying that this was technically supposed to be posted yesterday, and with Firefox being lame, my entire post deleted itself and didn’t save a draft copy! I was also extremely busy after getting frustrated, as I was part of something all day so I didn’t get home last night until about 10:30pm; therefore, I’m stuck writing two reviews today, starting with yesterday’s now; and today’s tonight. [if that makes any sense]

Thanks for understanding, and now-

on to the actual review!

weirdoween2015It’s always in New York isn’t it? [sorry, any New York readers] It’s either Monsters, Aliens, Super heroes, or anything else that isn’t supposed to happen in the world..

Today’s [although, technically yesterday’s] movie review also takes place in New York, specifically – New York City where a group of bizarre murders seem to point to a group of grotesquely deformed homeless people living in the sewers. To find out what’s happening, it’s going to take a courageous policeman, a photo journalist and his girlfriend, and a nutty bum – who seems to know a lot about the creatures then he lets on, to try and figure out just what is going on, and how to stop them from continuing.

The movie itself isn’t a masterpiece to say in the least, with it’s small budget and little to unknown actors but, it has itself a cult following that the fans love – for being less than good. But for as awkward, terrible, and weird of a film it comes across as – I enjoy the movie. That’s right, I enjoyed C.H.U.D.

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C.H.U.D. or Cannibalistic Humanoid Underground Dwellers, is an odd film. It’s notorious for having a low budget… but the story is alright, and the sewer sets look decent when they crawl to the underground. Daniel Stern is the cook/manager of a soup kitchen who is wondering where his assorted homeless buddies have disappeared to. But it’s Christopher Curry who is very good as a police officer searching for his missing wife. These scenes with Curry and Stern are funny [and not only due to the bad acting] and it’s interesting to watch their friendship develop as they deal with the rampaging CHUDs. One interesting note: watch for John Goodman as a cop, being as this is one of his earliest roles, he does get slaughtered in a diner. It’s cheesy, but it’s entertaining to say in the least. It’s not a bad scene, it just could have been..more.

If we were to look back to when the movie was made, the creature effects were actually quite good..at least for what they were. But, of course, with today’s standard – they are quite primitive looking and they feel like they’re out of date. The music score in the movie bears typical tones of 80’s horror music, being symphonic in a way that will almost always lead up to the scares. And it does work well, think about it; without such music, horror movies would be less interesting to watch.

Unfortunately, this is where the entertainment value drops – dramatically. The problems are high with movie, with it’s direction feeling like it’s lacking, the pacing being really off, and one of the biggest flaws is with it being it’s basic story construction. Simply put, there are too many characters. Kim Greist is an alright person to look at, but her character is really tacked on – I mean, she just gives us a pretty face to put in danger.. She and John Heard have no chemistry whatsoever, and it’s damn near impossible to believe they’re supposed to act as a couple. Even if these kinds of problems are found in some of the most watchable of horror films, why is it so noticeable here? One flaw, that people bring up a lot is that C.H.U.D. just isn’t scary or even remotely exciting.. The C.H.U.D. “monsters”, who we learn are actually homeless people exposed to radiation, look kind of cool. [see above!] But they don’t seem to move fast enough to be a threat to anyone under age 80.. It’s as if the movie itself relies on their sharp claws and teeth to make them seem formidable; which doesn’t work as effectively as one would hope. We don’t see enough of them in action either, and when we do; it’s only body parts and wounds that are shown on their victims. If you know even a little bit about movie editing, this is a sure tell sign of a very low budget.

Also, because of it’s alright script, why wouldn’t the government, who’s working with big industry types, be the big bad? One concern/complaint I have is by the end of the movie, after things seem to going for the worse, the head of the chemical company is killed – and then the film concludes abruptly. Wait. What this implies then is killing man in charge of all that chemical waste was all that really needed to be done in order to stop the C.H.U.D.s? But, what about all of the other monsters still left in the sewers?? Other than the one beheaded by Ms. Greist, I don’t recall seeing any of the others killed! Is that the movie’s way of saying that there is a homeless problem in New York City? That’s…kind of strange actually. I don’t get it.

C.H.U.D. is one of those movies that is hard to recommend because it isn’t that great: it’s cheesy, it’s ridiculous, and it’s a cult classic for a reason. It isn’t a gory film, or even remotely scary; but for some reason [probably for how bad it is] it’s enjoyable. So if you’re looking for a movie to waste some time, and you don’t care about the fantastic writing skills – why not try it out? If you don’t make it all the way through the film though, I’ll understand. Y’know, maybe I should talk about an actual good movie next..

But, If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review[s], please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tonight [to make up for having to rewrite yesterday’s] when I talk about weirdo’ween #19! – STAY TUNED!

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #17: The Monster Squad [1987]

weirdoween2015As most of you know, I’m a fairly big fan of Monster films. Frankenstein stands as one of my all time favorites, and the Universal Monster films are something that deserve all the love they got when they were first released. [I’m even trying to collect them all on Blu ray. Slowly] If you had friends who liked the same topic, such as films, as well, chances are; you’d probably make a club dedicated to said topic. It could be about anything really: comics, movies, video games; you get the idea. Can you imagine a club dedicated to monsters! Now, that would be an awesome club to be part of: but what would you name it? Monster Madness? The Miniature Monsters? Oh I got it! Why not: The Monster Squad? Wait..that’s probably already taken.. In light of us trying to figure out a monster club name, let’s talk about a monster movie from the late ’80s that has not one but four different monsters in it – and the kids who try to stop them! That movie, is none other than The Monster Squad!

weirdo'ween-#17The Monster Squad was directed by Fred Dekkar, a man you probably recognize as the Director of another 80s classic horror, Night Of The Creeps. The Monster Squad though, follows in the tradition as a horror-comedy film about a gang of grade-school kids who save their town from Dracula and his band of goons. Although it’s a fun film, The Monster Squad is no doubt, a much more enjoyable movie than Night Of The Creeps.

In the movie, The Monster Squad refers to a tree house club of five kids who call themselves horror fanatics. They have comic books, magazines, and posters scattered all over this little tree house of theirs. Unbeknownst to them, their enthusiasm toward the genre they love so dearly, would suddenly come in handy as their town in abruptly invaded by Dracula [and a few other memorable horror villains] in their most classic form. According to the story we’re given at the beginning of the movie, Drac is terrorizing the town only because he’s trying to locate a powerful amulet which has the potential for ruling the world type business. It’s when no one else believes the kids, or when no one else is powerful enough to stop them using traditional crime fighting methods [if we can be honest, arresting the Wolfman didn’t work out as effectively as the cops hoped], it’s up to The Monster Squad [with the help of Frankenstein, who decides to switch sides!] to save the day! The film is filled with great scenes as well, especially with memorable characters. Take Boo Radley for example, he’s a strange recluse of a man who all the kids fear without knowing why. [he’s just an old man who lives a few houses down from the kids] in one particular scene, when we learn that Sean, the leader of The Monster Squad, is given a book [that his mother got from a flea market?] that can explain why the monsters are reappearing in modern 1987, he has no choice but to seek the man’s help. As it turns out, the book is in German, which definitely confirms that the team of kids need Boo Radley. Not only does this “scary man” speak the language written inside, he kindly offers to help them get through the important passages in the book! Also, it happens that he knows what monsters are.. If you’re going to watch this with a younger audience, you probably will need to explain to your kids what the numbers tattooed on the scary mans forearm are..moving on.

you can’t say this isn’t the coolest group of kids ever.. I’d join their club!

The Monster Squad was done in the most positive light possible – it didn’t talk down to kids and put them in control when the adults wouldn’t believe them that Monsters were taking over their town. Plus, there were other monster references besides the scary ones! The children, kids and teens cast in this film were adorable and cast properly: there was the smart leader type kid who was obsessed with monsters, your typical “fat” kid, – who’s known as fat kid – the adorable little girl/sister type who wants to be a part of everything her older brothers and his friends did, and shy little boy who was really the coolest of them all! Shane Black, who was a popular screenwriter of the 80’s, knew what he was doing with this one; and Fred Dekker directed his young group really well. The movie never felt silly, it was a believable kids’ world where kids were the heroes of the day, and the parents were thankful they were..cause let’s be honest, the parents had no clue what to do.

By keeping the film true to all the rules of the classic Universal Monster films, which is the main reason why this film works so well. Dekker manages to ensure that the film will appeal to two of the major horror audiences; fans of the classics that will appreciate the plot and humor, and younger kids, who are bound to get a kick out of the characters and their witty dialogue. It’s something, for everyone. Be warned though, the film is very short, running at just over eighty minutes, but it has enough to keep everyone satisfied, with enough screen time for all the different monsters. What made this movie so special is it felt like we were seeing a “what if” The Goonies took on the old monsters.. Not to mention, the movie has arguable one of the coolest lines in film history; “Wolfman’s got nards!”, It’s a very 80s movie, but it’s all part of it’s charm.

So check out The Monster Squad! It’s the perfect blend of monster madness and child like wonder. It also includes a ton of references to older horror films, so it really is something for everyone! It’s cheesy, but in the best way possible, so if you’re looking for gorier films; you’re going to be missing out on this one! But, If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review[s], please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #18! – STAY TUNED!

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #16: The Babadook [2014]

weirdoween2015After reviewing not one but three movies in the Hatchet series, which were over the top [and gory] slasher films, I decided it was time to switch it up and review one of my favorite films of 2014: The Babadook. I’ve actually technically already reviewed it, here, But with it’s hauntingly beautiful cinematography, it’s really good acting, and even it’s ever depressing tone, I was begging this movie to be as good as it was living it up to be, especially after everyone wanted me to see it – and it certainly was.. It was everything I hoped it would be; with it being a foreign film, there were actors that I didn’t recognize – It’s made it something I found myself to really enjoy. This film was atmospheric, it was extremely suspenseful at times- without relying on too many jump scares- and best of all: it felt real. So let’s jump in to a film that really surprised me when it was first released. It’s not so much violent and gory, but rather psychological. So, whether it’s a word, or a look, let’s talk about..

weirdo'ween-#16The Babadook follows Amelia, a widow who lost her husband in a car crash on the way to give birth to Samuel – their only child. As seen in the movie, she struggles to cope with her fate as a single mom, especially with Samuel‘s constant fear of monsters and violent response as his way to overcome these fears. Because of this, Amelia has almost no friends, and the friends she does have become distant. Just when you think that things cannot get any worse, Amelia and Samuel read a book they found in Samuel‘s book shelf which spoke about the ‘Babadook‘ monster: who hides in the dark areas of their house. Fears become superstition when even Amelia begins to feel the effect of Babadook and desperately tries to destroy the book. This is the nightmarish experience a mother and son encounter for the rest of movie; or in this case, story.

At first glance, The Babadook may sound like it’s a tale that meant to warn people not let children make creepy stories up into their heads. Although understandable, as a way of coping, it may also seem like it’s one of those old horror movies with children being influenced by a ghost. [kind of like Poltergeist] The monster that’s called The Babadook, comes off as having the potential of being a silly urban legend, such as Slender Man[I am so tired of Slender Man] that is destined to be flooded with it’s own online stories, or simply just another horror monster, but what makes the film surprisingly effective is that it has a different plan for itself than “just scaring the audience.” More than anything, it may as well be a character study of a mother who is having a hard time moving on after the tragedy she’s been through and trying to raise her only son. It is a slow burner, as the real horror doesn’t come out that quick, when it comes to the characters we’ve already been introduced to.. it’s already built itself up as a study high. The tension you come to feel as the movie progresses is just award for being caught up by the core story line.

it doesn’t help that Samuel is a creepy looking kid.. I blame the Monster in his head

One thing that is important to note is the Babadook himself. When we actually start to see it, we notice it has an almost ridiculous design and his story is told well by a twisted storybook with wonderful illustrations. It almost feels like the movie is trying to explain that he isn’t the point of the film.. that he’s basically Amelia‘s “coping method” of sorts. The pacing of Amelia‘s life may move too fast within the film, but the sadness and deprivation beneath those regular troubling days are noticeable; you can tell that she’s struggling with Samuel, that she still isn’t over the loss of her husband, and that the plot is mostly concerned with Amelia finding a way to overcome Samuel‘s behavioral issues and her memories of accident; rather than dealing with this supernatural threat. What I’m trying to get at, is that even if there’s a “monster” tormenting this family, it still feels more like they’re being tormented by life, and the “monster” is their grievance personified.

This is where I sound like I’m complaining – at least, on behalf of some people. The thing about The Babadook is some horror fans might get disappointed for not giving The Babadook monster enough of the characterization he seemingly deserves. [I’ve heard this complaint a lot] Even if it is a lot more interesting to follow than his tricks and angry monster feelings, that is why I keep claiming that the the movie is best described as a gloomy story about a mother and a son who are desperately fighting to keep a hold of themselves and promise to protect each other from the opposing odds; even if this promise doesn’t always apply, The Babadook is more than just another horror film. While it still has the right amount of admirably campy scares, which I absolutely love, the film often explores to the larger and much affecting side of the story, making it more depressing – rather than terrifying..though it is terrifying in it’s own right.

So like I said in my original review of The Babadook; Unless you count It Followswhich I talked about in great detail over here, It’s been a very long time since I have seen a horror film this effective; especially one from the last year! The Babadook is a film that is more interested in engaging the audience with its characters, relying on it’s subtly and clever imagery to legitimately scare its audience; rather than go cheap, and use ineffective jump scares. [like 99.9% of horror films now a days] If you haven’t seen it yet – take advantage of it being on Netflix; because every positive review you’ve read is true, just take one word of advice: if you have a book calling itself Mister Babadook on your shelf, and you don’t recognize it – don’t touch it..don’t even look at it: Chances are, it’s probably not such a good idea.

If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review[s] please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #17! – STAY TUNED!

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #15: HATCHET III [2013]

weirdoween2015Here we are: our final trip into the swamp to put an end to Victor Crowley – even if we haven’t had much luck the past two films! [if you missed part 1 or part 2, be sure to check them out as well!]

Although this final Hatchet film isn’t Directed by Adam Green, he actually had complete control over the project, plus the new Director; B J McDonnell, was handpicked by Green – and He did a fantastic job! So for today’s weirdo’ween post, we visit Honey Island Swamp one last time, and we’re going to finish Crowley off. for good.

weirdo'ween-#15Now the important thing to note about this film is that unlike the other Hatchet films, this one took away a lot of the comedy aspects. Don’t get me wrong, there are in movie jokes, but it’s become a full fledged horror film this time around, and it’s great!

Picking up from where Hatchet II left off, Marybeth Dunston [still played by the wonderful Danielle Harris] blows off the head of Victor Crowley with a shotgun. Repeatedly. She walks away and comes across the bodies of almost everyone from the previous film, when she hears Crowley, deep in the woods. Marybeth starts up a nearby chainsaw, but is grabbed by Victor[poor girl can’t catch a break!] Marybeth then kicks him, and as he falls backwards onto the chainsaw, he is then cut him straight down the middle of his torso. She grabs a shotgun from one of the dead men nearby, and shoots Victor‘s head, and walks back into the city’s sheriff’s station, carrying only his scalp. Sheesh. What an opening!

Of course, when Marybeth arrives and explains what just happened, no one believes her and they place her in a cell for the murders. After some discussion, and a hearty explanation in full, finally convinces the Deputies, The Sheriff, [played by Zach Galligan] paramedics, [but, why paramedics? are they going to revive a decapitated person?] and an entire SWAT team go to the swamp, only to find countless bodies and body parts. Working as a team, they start dragging body bags onto their boat.

even covered in Crowley blood, I love me some Danielle Harris

Meanwhile, an annoying reporter who has been listening to the police frequency shows up at the station, and demands to speak to Marybeth. As it turns out, this reporter is the ex-wife of the Sheriff and she manages to manipulate one of the deputies into doing whatever she wants. She comes bearing bad news – Crowley can’t be killed. She explains that he will always return because he’s on a mission – and Marybeth is the solution: Being as she’s the last of the Dunston family, Victor needs to be put at rest. The reporter then convinces one of the security guards to let Marybeth out, and the two go on a trip to find Crowley‘s father’s ashes, which will help put him at ease.

Crowley, of course, has resurfaced and is killing any all law enforcement he can find..in the goriest ways possible. Once again, like the other two Hatchet films, the kills are unique; and gorier than the last two films combined! As expected, the Hatchet franchise has been something of a roller-coaster ride, either lots of fun, or enough to satisfy the horror fans. I for one, love these films; all the films run at around a eighty minutes, give or take, and they all feature enough gore and insanity to impress even the hardened of horror fan. With this third installment, Green has reconnected with his footing, which is a great mix of gratuitous gore and stable story telling; and, not to mention, terrific performances by the likes of people we’ve come to know in the horror genre. People like Derek Mears and Sid Haig! [who gives probably the best performance since Rob Zombie‘s The Devil’s Rejects]

So check out Hatchet III, but do so by picking up the Dark Sky‘s Blu-ray version.. This one comes with two different commentaries that are informative not only on this film but on the horror genre in general. It has some excellent behind-the-scenes footage of how Kane‘s makeup is applied and how terrible mosquitoes really are in the Louisiana swamps, where the film was made/filmed. It’s a truly a must-own disc for the Hatchet fans.

And thus ends the Hatchet trilogy review[s]. Which film was your favorite? Was it the original Hatchet film that came out in 2006? or was it the final one, Hatchet III, that ended the series? Let me know in a comment or two! Also, keep an eye open for a cameo from a familiar face from [the first] Hatchet in this finale film! Fans will greatly appreciate! However, with this being the final Hatchet film, the next review [tomorrow’s] will be something completely unrelated to this series; which leads me to my next question:

If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review[s] please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #16! – STAY TUNED!

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #13: HATCHET [2006]

weirdoween2015We’ve all heard of local legends/ghost stories surrounding our town. Whether it’s Bloody Mary or the Boogyman, there’s always one that stands out amongst the rest. It doesn’t matter what the story is behind the legend, one fact remains the same: the “spirit” of the legend will never die, unless they’re put to rest. Enter our crew of tourists. They decide to go on a boat ride on the haunted waters of the Louisiana bayous where they learn the terrifying tale of local legend Victor Crowley. According to the stories, Victor is a horribly disfigured man who was tragically and accidentally killed with a hatchet by the hands of his own father. But when their boat sinks and the ghost story turns out to be a real thing, the group tries desperately to escape the swamp with their lives…and all of their pieces. That’s right everyone, today we’re talking about Adam Green‘s classic 80s throwback horror slasher: Hatchet. What makes this review so special, is that I’m going to be reviewing it’s sequels: Hatchet II and Hatchet III tomorrow, and Thursday respectively! But today; we’re starting at the very beginning of this trilogy: the way it was meant to be.

weirdo'ween-#13Hatchet begins in Louisiana during Mardi Gras with two friends walking around the streets, with another part of the opening already including a cameo from Robert Englund and Tony Todd[though Englund gets killed off in the first 10 minutes.. talk about a risky move!] These two guys are down for spring break and after deciding they’ve had enough of Mardi Gras, decide the next course of action is to take a haunted swamp ride; headed by Reverend Zombie. This is where we meet the core group of people we will be following for the rest of the film.

As they travel out farther out into the far reaches of the swamp, their guide starts talking about the local legend of a man known as Victor Crowley. Though no one believes him, [at first] the guide starts looking, and acting, like he has absolutely no idea what he is doing.. Which he later admits to, saying it was a way to make a few extra bucks. The boat eventually ends up sinking in the middle of the swamp and the boarders of the boat learn that they are officially in Victor Crowley‘s territory. With no help coming anytime soon, and little [to no] cell phone service, it looks like the only way off the island they landed on is to take the path behind the old Crowley home; where his spirit is rumored to be still living after his father accidentally hit him in the face with a hatchet..

a face only a father could love.

Hatchet is what some would call a blood soaked love letter to the campy horror-slasher films of the ’80s. It pays homage to films like Friday The 13th and Sleepaway Camp, all while catering to the fans who love a good old-fashioned gore fest, with the occasional set of boobs of course. When I first bought this movie, I hadn’t even seen it yet; I bought it blindly because I had heard so many good things! Of course, I was not disappointed. The important thing about the movie is to not take it seriously, not even 10 minutes in, and you can tell that it was definitely not meant to be. It’s a very campy film, but that’s because it’s supposed to be that way. There are also plenty of hilarious in jokes that will get you laughing, further proving the not so serious tone. The film’s set-up is repetitive, the dialogue is corny, and the special effects [while over the top] are great. That’s what makes it fun to watch: it’s fun. You can’t go into this movie expecting some great masterpiece or even a really good horror movie; You’re supposed to go into this movie expecting a campy gore-fest that you can laugh at.. because of how ridiculous it is! and yes – this is a good thing!

From start to finish – all 84 minutes of Hatchet is pure slasher goodness. Rather than being just a stale homage to the franchise films that dominated his childhood, you can tell that Adam Green has actually created an character all his own, that pays loving tribute, rather than references to other horror icons. While Victor Crowley might never reach the heights of Freddy, Jason or Michael, he’s certainly the stuff fan-favorites are made of: a unique monster with an easy to remember name, with some unique kills under his belt! You just can’t go wrong with a horror movie made by a horror movie fan with outrageous effects. It’s the perfect movie to put on during a Friday night, and it’s certainly one of the finest modern slashers to come along in a recent history.

The problem is, a lot of people didn’t like Hatchet.. but forget them! If you like slashers, and over the top gore; you’ll have a blast with this movie. It has a bit of everything for everyone: boobs, gore, funny moments, and cameos galore! Please.. check out Hatchet, you’ll have a great time, and you won’t regret it!

and another thing! If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #14 – which, as discussed above, will be Hatchet II! – STAY TUNED!

open wide! [a small example of the over-the-top gore in HATCHET]

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #12: The Thing [1982]

weirdoween2015Can you imagine being trapped in the middle of Antarctica during a blizzard? [that’s like: colder than cold!] Even worse, can you imagine being trapped in Antarctica with your fellow workers in a facility; all while an alien creature has the ability to mimic your best friend, and you don’t know just what’s going on? That’s exactly what happens for Helicopter pilot J.R MacReady, who’s hellbent on finding out just what is going on around him..I mean, what can you do when you’re amongst an alien with the power to transform and take the appearance of anybody else is amongst them. Who is infected already, and who can be trusted? All those questions [and more] will be asked, in this edition of Weirdo’ween‘s movie: John Carpenter‘s The Thing.

weirdo'ween-#12The Thing takes place in the Antarctic in 1982, where it mainly focuses on a group of American scientists. We are given no introduction to their mission, but are thrust into their lives when a pair of [seemingly] crazy Norwegians appear out of nowhere at their base camp, chasing an escaped dog. The Norwegians are abruptly killed, and the dog finds its way into scientists’ base, which is when things really start to pick up. It soon becomes quite clear that this “dog” is actually a shape-shifting alien organism, which seems to take it upon itself to take the physical form of its victims! In other words, as it begins to eat the Americans, it also can imitate them so well, that the remaining humans cannot distinguish the difference between their friends and their new found enemies!

The pack of scientists, led by one J. R MacReady[played brilliantly by Kurt Russell] begin to fight for their own survival, using only their remaining wits.. Of course, many questions start arising: If this Thing is among them, then how are they supposed to go about revealing it? Is there only one? Or how many Things are there? How can this Thing be killed? [Can it even be destroyed at all?]

Thankfully, the creature’s origins in the film are explained easily: Thirty thousand years ago a spacecraft crash landed on Earth, and was encased in the Antarctic ice. While The Thing tried to escape, it was quickly discovered [in the ice] by the Norwegians, who unknowingly accidentally released it from its natural icy prison. What makes this movie so good is it makes you ask questions as you continue watching such as: “How am I supposed to stay alive if any, if not all, of the crew is infected?” The Thing is extremely smart and calculating, forcing each decision the few remaining survivors one step closer to killing off the entire group. It plans for this, it hopes for this: and sadly – things really could have gone from bad to worse really fast. MacReady takes control of the situation with a no-nonsense attitude, but over the course of the film, even he can see the reality of the unfortunate situation; that eventually – this thing might actually come out on top.

But the absolute best thing about this movie [besides everything] is the visual effects. The creature design of The Thing is one of those great design masterpieces that manage to feel so real, it feels almost out of place. Like I said before, we actually get to see an alien life form in the shape of a dog physically attach to a human being and try to steal its form; the same thing also becomes a disembodied head sprout legs and crawl around the research station like a spider! I mean, yes; it’s gross, gut wrenching and certainly disturbing but The Thing itself is unlike any alien you have ever seen in a movie before.. and for that, it deserves all the credit.

Another thing that makes this movie such a great film is that The Thing actually provides little to no answers, leaving us to seek them for ourselves. Naturally, this infuriated many audiences when it was first released.. Viewers wanted closure, answers, and a sense of victory over the “monster.” Instead, Carpenter gave us a look at the state of humanity in 1982, leaving us with more questions than answers: Who won? Who was still human? Did it even matter anymore? How do we know we aren’t already living in a world composed of “things?” In my opinion, this makes the movie better, though at the same time, it also makes the movie feel depressing. Even in the last shot of the film, when Childs and MacReady are seen taking swigs of a bottle of whiskey during a wide shot of the camp in flames fire after “it’s all over”; both men just sit among the burning wreckage.. waiting for the flames to die down the winter weather to ultimately consume them.. it makes us wonder: could either [if not both] of these two men be The Thing? It’s a question that is still being talked about to this day, and the movie is over 30 years old!

If you consider yourself a horror fan, then you have to have seen The Thing by now, and if you haven’t; get on it. Seriously. It’s scary, it’s dark, and it can be fairly depressing; especially when you come to the conclusion that the ending might just not be as happy as you would hope. But it’s a masterpiece in it’s own right. Though, be aware: it’s not strictly horror, since it could also be considered a sci-fi film as well, but it’s just so good; it definitely one of those movies that deserves it’s praise! [even if it was a flop when it first released!]

Another thing! If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tomorrow morning when I talk about weirdo’ween #13! STAY TUNED! [and with this post now written, we are officially caught up on weirdo’ween movie reviews, yay!]

because I know that you wanted to see the dog ‘transform’ ..

THANKS FOR READING.

WEIRDO’WEEN #11: Tucker And Dale VS Evil [2010]

weirdoween2015

writer’s note: I understand this was technically supposed to come out yesterday, but since I had my family had it’s Thanksgiving dinner last night, I had no choice but to wait until now for #11. Tonight, I will be writing up #12, and tomorrow morning will be #13; therefore, everything will be on track again.


Meet Tucker and Dale: two lovable hillbillies from West Virginia. They’re best friends and do everything together. This weekend, they are planning on headin’ to their “fixer-upper” vacation cabin [that Tucker just bought] to drink some beer, do some fishin’, and have an all around good time. Y’know, Hillbilly stuff.. I don’t know much about that lifestyle, but from what I gather; they’re pretty laid back people. But when they run into a group of preppy college kids who assume from their looks that they must be in-bred, chainsaw wielding killers, Tucker & Dale‘s vacation takes a bloody [and hilarious] turn for the worse..and that’s what our movie today is about: the unexpected situations that they fall into – even if all they wanted was a get away from society for a few days! As I shared on Facebook yesterday, today’s  movie review is on none other than Tucker and Dale VS Evil.

weirdo'ween-#11As I said, the movie revolves around two hilarious hillbillies: Tucker and Dale, who just want to have a weekend away from society at their “Vacation Home”. Shortly after they arrive, a group of College kids show up at a nearby camp and immediately wrongly assuming Tucker and Dale are psychotic rednecks out to murder them. [you know, because of course they are..] Considering that their property is filled with tools for renovations, such as chainsaws and a wood chipper, it’s not long before the comedy and gruesome carnage start, proving the line it blurs between horror and comedy! Like Shaun Of The Dead and Zombieland did for their respective genres, Tucker and Dale feels like it fits right in, being one of the funniest and surprising movies in recent years! [it was shelved for three years before it’s initial release..why it was, I’ll never know] One thing that makes it so entertaining, from a horror perspective is, the amount of mistakes that result in a lot of gory [and creative] deaths for the dim-witted college kids! I mean, one dives head first into the wood chipper while trying to stab Tucker! [and because he tries to pull the kid out, it looks like he’s pushing him farther in! Yeah, comedy gold, kids!]

But what makes this movie special is the obvious relationship between Tucker and Dale themselves. The two are sweet, helpful, and hopelessly clueless guys who are only involved because of the disaster that the College kids created around them.. One message that certainly comes across loud and clear [yet, subconsciously at the same time] is that appearances can be deceiving and that you shouldn’t judge a proverbial book by the cover.. Because people are still their own individuals and not just the stereotypes they portray. That’s right, Tucker and Dale VS Evil comes with a lesson to be learned!

The movie actually has a lot to say about stereotypes, and not just the ones I mentioned above. But it also mentions how people project onto others those stereotypes, and their own inner “dark sides” come about based on those stereotypes. Being as it’s also a horror film, there is definitely blood and gore involved, but the violence is presented in such a comedic way, you almost laugh when it comes up..it’s not scary in the slightest. I remember the first time I watched it [Netflix!] and thought: this is surprisingly, a really good movie. It’s depressing to think [and realize] that we probably won’t be getting a sequel, but if enough of us protest..maybe? [I really want a sequel, guys..]

So please, check out Tucker and Dale VS Evil; it’s funny, it’s gory,  but most of all – it has heart. It’s unfortunate that it wasn’t recognized as much, but it may be because of the fact that it didn’t get a wide-spread release! [tell everyone about it!] What makes the film so much fun is the stereotyping it picks at, and the hilarious deaths make it all the more worthwhile. Even without a chance at sequel, [though, if one did appear I’d be happy!] it’s a fun film for everyone – even if you aren’t that into horror as a genre.

Another thing! If you have an idea for the next weirdo’ween review please let me know which movie[s] you’d like to see next! If you found yourself to enjoy this particular review – and want to see more – then take a minute and follow me over on my Facebook page [it’s at over 120+ likes almost at 130!] By clicking that “like” button, you’ll see every post from warrenisweird the very moment it’s been posted online; as well as links to articles and pictures/videos that will not be featured here on the blog. Every “like” helps me a ton, giving me the ability to write more posts for you to read, so be sure to tell the horror enthusiast in your life to do the same, and share The Facebook Page with your family and friends! Join me tonight when I talk about weirdo’ween #12! STAY TUNED!

THANKS FOR READING.